Well hello there! I am Erik, and this is blog.

This blog is fucking shit, but it's also fucking shit. Come enjoy some fucking shit, it's great.

Do not question the content you may find here, if it's here, it's because I want it to be, and that's about as much of an explanation I have, judge me all you want, I'm okay with wasting my time with this, so it's really just a matter if you are too.

If you have a lot of time to waste, check out the fabulous tunes tag, because music is just great, and there's a lot of interesting stuff in there from time to time of all genres.

Feel free to ask me things, send me things, yell at me, start dumb conversations, whatever you like, I like friends, I'm just a dink and rarely initiate things myself..

 

maghrabiyya:

carnivaloftherandom:

socimages:

Nope!
Brain studies find that concern for justice and equality is linked to logic, not emotion.
By Lisa Wade, PhD
A new study finds that people with high “justice sensitivity” are using logic, not emotions.  Subjects were put in a fMRI machine, one that measures ongoing brain activity and shown videos of people acting kindly or cruelly toward a homeless person.
Some respondents reacted more strongly than others — hence the high versus low justice sensitivity — and an analysis of the high sensitivity individuals’ brain activity showed that they were processing the images in the parts of the brain where logic and rationality live.   “Individuals who are sensitive to justice and fairness do not seem to be emotionally driven,” explained one of the scientists, “Rather, they are cognitively driven.”
Activists aren’t angry, they reasonably object to unjust circumstances that they understand all too well.
Image borrowed from Jamie Keiles at Teenagerie, who is a high sensitivity individual.
Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions, with Myra Marx Ferree. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

Auto-reblog.

after constantly being made fun of for being “overly politically correct” by my own family members, i needed to see this again

maghrabiyya:

carnivaloftherandom:

socimages:

Nope!

Brain studies find that concern for justice and equality is linked to logic, not emotion.

By Lisa Wade, PhD

A new study finds that people with high “justice sensitivity” are using logic, not emotions.  Subjects were put in a fMRI machine, one that measures ongoing brain activity and shown videos of people acting kindly or cruelly toward a homeless person.

Some respondents reacted more strongly than others — hence the high versus low justice sensitivity — and an analysis of the high sensitivity individuals’ brain activity showed that they were processing the images in the parts of the brain where logic and rationality live.   “Individuals who are sensitive to justice and fairness do not seem to be emotionally driven,” explained one of the scientists, “Rather, they are cognitively driven.”

Activists aren’t angry, they reasonably object to unjust circumstances that they understand all too well.

Image borrowed from Jamie Keiles at Teenagerie, who is a high sensitivity individual.

Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions, with Myra Marx Ferree. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

Auto-reblog.

after constantly being made fun of for being “overly politically correct” by my own family members, i needed to see this again

me after calling someone out: you must be wearing orthopedic shoes because you stand corrected

highpriestofharmfulmatter:

lousymouse:

neuroether:

lol deep goth

Wet punk. Okay.

Dust punk. depression-era midwest rebellion.

RABIES CORE

THIS IS MY CALLING

(Source: nanobotswarm)